Life After Google Reader

March 28, 2013 at 11:52 pm | Posted in Research, Social Networks, Uncategorized | Leave a comment
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News gathering onlineI’ve used Google Reader to marshal news feeds from blogs and other web sites for a long time now.  I described my strategy in a blog post  almost 2 years ago.  Now, it seems, Google is going to kill Reader, leaving me (and a very large number of other users) to find an alternative tool.

I get that if a service is free then you have no comeback.  I also know there are other tools that could be used instead.  My beef is that a service I’d set up and which has been serving me well for a long time is now going away, without warning and without any apparent logic behind the decision.

This post on O’Reilly Radar makes a good point – certainly one I needed to think long and hard about.  Om Malik’s brief post on the demise of Google Reader raises a good point:  If we can’t trust Google to keep successful applications around, why should we bother trying them out?

So, with Reader due to cease in July, it was time to look for a replacement.  The first breakthrough was finding this post on the blog page for Feedly.  The blog explained that migrating from Reader doesn’t have to be a pain, because:

  • If you log into Feedly with your Google account, then Feedly automatically synchronises with your Google Reader feeds.
  • So, when Reader shuts down in July, Feedly just takes over – no further action required!

There’s also free apps for IOS (separate versions for iPhone and iPad) and Android, allowing me to move away from the trusty but slightly clunky Feeds app that I’ve been using to read items offline.

So far, so good.  Now, I like to be able to share items that particularly interest me with my contacts on Twitter, LinkedIn and (very occasionally) Facebook and I’ve been doing that using my favourite integration platform IFTTT.  This relies on the fact that IFTTT has connections (they call them channels) for both Google Reader (my source) and each of my targets (Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook).  The Google Reader channel lets me trigger an action any time I star an item in Reader and then lets me use elements in the post to my targets (blog name, title, URL).  Sadly there’s currently no channel on IFTTT for Feedly, though I made sure I submitted a request for one.

So the next step was to find an intermediate platform.  The Feedly equivalent to Google Reader’s star action is called “save for later”.  Investigating the settings in Feedly I found that you can configure the s”save for later” function to post items to Pocket,  which does have an IFTTT channel.  So, now I can rewrite my IFTTT publishing rules to use Pocket and anything I bookmark (save for later) in Feedly will appear on Twitter, LinkedIn and (if I choose) Facebook.  Result!

As a bonus, I found that for anywhere I can email a link (say in a tweet), I can send that email to Pocket and the page the URL points to will be added to my queue in Pocket as well.

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Social Media and Me – Pause for Thought

June 18, 2010 at 11:42 pm | Posted in Social Networks | 4 Comments
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It seems scarcely possible that it’s a year since I made the decision to strike out on my own as an independent consultant. One of the first things that struck me was that I would need to find a way to replace all the information resources I’d become used to after nearly 10 years with a major software vendor. The next thing that struck me was that I’d better learn a bit about marketing – quickly! I remember asking my friend and colleague Simon Perry of Thinking String whose blogs I should be reading. His answer surprised me more than a little “You shouldn’t be reading blogs, you should be writing one.” It’s nearly a year ago that I took the first tentative step on this site, devoting my very first blog post to a description of how I would bend social media to meeting these two needs in my fledgling business.

So, one year on, as I pass another milestone in my career, it seems appropriate to look back on that strategy and to consider what I’ve learned – what worked and what didn’t; what’s coming along that might help and what I’d still like to see.

Clearly, a blog needed to be at the heart of my strategy, giving me a platform to showcase my skills and experience and to engage in discussions with experts in the field. After seeking advice from established bloggers, I settled on WordPress. I decide to have my blog hosted on wordpress.com, to give me the simplest possible start. Does it damage my “brand” because it’s not hosted within my domain? I honestly don’t know. What do you think?

One thing that doesn’t seem to have worked for me has been social bookmarking.  Watching the statistics on my WordPress blog, I noticed eventually, that I was getting traffic via sites like Digg and StumbleUpon.  This prompted me to look at whether I could encourage readers to tag a blog post they found interesting, by providing the buttons on the page, through AddThis .  This is where I started to run into the limitations of hosting my blog on wordpress.com.  Unlike the hosted version of WordPress, which has a plug-in to implement the AddThis menu, in the wordpress.com layout, I have to place it in the sidebar and I’m not convinced it works properly anyway.  In any event, since I added the button bar, I’ve seen no clicks to bookmark posts.  Is it because of the position of the toolbar or is it because no-one thinks the material worth bookmarking?  I don’t know.

The biggest problem I face with blogging – and I’m sure this is true for many bloggers – is actually writing the posts!  It’s not a matter of thinking of topics or deciding what to say, although that’s what I thought would be the limitation when I started.  Rather, it’s the time it takes to actually write the article, polish it into satisfactory style and grammar and assemble suitable graphics and links.  I tend to make my blog posts moderately long, compared to what seems to be the norm.   Writing 1,000 words to a standard that I’m happy with can take me 4-5 hours, even when I have a very clear idea of what I want to say.  Finding the time to do that is always a problem – especially recently, since I switched from self-employment back to a permanent role – and it’s fatal if I interrupt the writing before it’s finished.  This post sat untouched as a half-written draft for 2 weeks before I came back to finish it off.  I’m not sure what I can do about that, although one approach that looks promising is using the iPhone app for WordPress.  I wouldn’t want to mess around with formatting using an on-screen keyboard – my HTML’s just not that good.  However, if I can do the basic layout, add the graphics and some text, it’s certainly feasible to add body text offline through the iPhone and sync the changes back to WordPress.  That will make use of dead time while I’m travelling, which is one of the major pressures on my time recently.

I’ve also been trying to reuse the material I do write.  I started by publishing some posts at Ezine Articles (you’ll also find an index of them on my blog here).  Not very post is suited to this platform though.  There are automated mechanisms to allow blog posts to be sent direct to Ezine Articles, but the site only accepts articles subject to strict rules.  You’re only allowed 2 links in the article body and there’s no graphics, so any of my posts requires modification first.  However, it’s worth the effort, generating a significant number of views.  It was here that I learned another valuable lesson about content:  by splitting long posts into smaller, linked articles, you get more chances to attract readers and they’re more likely to stay, following through the set of articles.

The next thing I’d like to try builds on this, by offering the same content in multiple different formats:

  • Write a blog post and publish it here
  • Simplify and publish as one or more articles on Ezine Articles
  • Produce a slide show to summarise  the topic, add the article text as speaker notes and publish it to Slideshare
  • Add an audio narration of the speaker notes, convert to a video at authorSTREAM

I have a topic already – a slide deck I prepared for a job interview some months back. All I need to do is find the time to produce the additional formats and publish them.

Earlier this year, I wrote about how a comment by my friend and small business marketing coach Greg Spence led me to investigate how to use Google Alerts to search for news stories around your main key word phrases. Since I posted that article, I’ve gradually migrated all the RSS feeds for blogs that I follow and added Twitter searches for those keywords as well. I’ve already described how I rely on the “Feeds” iPhone app

to synchronise with Google Reader, allowing me to browse all those items offline and mark the few that are sufficiently interesting to follow-up on. It did eventually occur to me that other people might find the same things interesting – after all, if you follow me on Twitter or read my blog, we’ve got something in common, haven’t we? While investigating a problem between Twitterfeed and ping.fm, I discovered that I can use ping.fm to monitor for new additions to the “shared items” list in Google Reader and then post the link to my contacts on LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook.

In my next post, I’ll look at the social networks I use to maintain my circle of contacts and how I notify those contacts of new content.

New Blog, Old Friend

March 18, 2010 at 10:46 pm | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment
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I’m always on the lookout for interesting new blogs, especially in my main subject area of Identity and Access management.  Of course, I try to follow the blogs of the best known gurus in my field.  However, I reserve space on my blog roll (over to the right =>) for people that I know and trust.

In this spirit, I just added a link to the “Joined Up Thinking” blog, maintained by Stephen Swann.  Stephen is Belfast based and we met around 8 years ago on opposite sides of an IAM project for a retail bank.  I stumbled upon Stephen through Twitter – he showed up in a search, fed through to Google Reader – and we took the advantage to reconnect through LinkedIn. 

Stephen is an experienced and thoughtful professional and I’ll follow his blogging with great interest.  I strongly recommend that you do too.

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