Life After Google Reader

March 28, 2013 at 11:52 pm | Posted in Research, Social Networks, Uncategorized | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , ,

News gathering onlineI’ve used Google Reader to marshal news feeds from blogs and other web sites for a long time now.  I described my strategy in a blog post  almost 2 years ago.  Now, it seems, Google is going to kill Reader, leaving me (and a very large number of other users) to find an alternative tool.

I get that if a service is free then you have no comeback.  I also know there are other tools that could be used instead.  My beef is that a service I’d set up and which has been serving me well for a long time is now going away, without warning and without any apparent logic behind the decision.

This post on O’Reilly Radar makes a good point – certainly one I needed to think long and hard about.  Om Malik’s brief post on the demise of Google Reader raises a good point:  If we can’t trust Google to keep successful applications around, why should we bother trying them out?

So, with Reader due to cease in July, it was time to look for a replacement.  The first breakthrough was finding this post on the blog page for Feedly.  The blog explained that migrating from Reader doesn’t have to be a pain, because:

  • If you log into Feedly with your Google account, then Feedly automatically synchronises with your Google Reader feeds.
  • So, when Reader shuts down in July, Feedly just takes over – no further action required!

There’s also free apps for IOS (separate versions for iPhone and iPad) and Android, allowing me to move away from the trusty but slightly clunky Feeds app that I’ve been using to read items offline.

So far, so good.  Now, I like to be able to share items that particularly interest me with my contacts on Twitter, LinkedIn and (very occasionally) Facebook and I’ve been doing that using my favourite integration platform IFTTT.  This relies on the fact that IFTTT has connections (they call them channels) for both Google Reader (my source) and each of my targets (Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook).  The Google Reader channel lets me trigger an action any time I star an item in Reader and then lets me use elements in the post to my targets (blog name, title, URL).  Sadly there’s currently no channel on IFTTT for Feedly, though I made sure I submitted a request for one.

So the next step was to find an intermediate platform.  The Feedly equivalent to Google Reader’s star action is called “save for later”.  Investigating the settings in Feedly I found that you can configure the s”save for later” function to post items to Pocket,  which does have an IFTTT channel.  So, now I can rewrite my IFTTT publishing rules to use Pocket and anything I bookmark (save for later) in Feedly will appear on Twitter, LinkedIn and (if I choose) Facebook.  Result!

As a bonus, I found that for anywhere I can email a link (say in a tweet), I can send that email to Pocket and the page the URL points to will be added to my queue in Pocket as well.

Advertisements

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.
Entries and comments feeds.