Out of the Loop

November 14, 2010 at 12:37 am | Posted in Cloud Security, Security Governance | 1 Comment
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Recently, I was reading the Times on the early train to London, and I came across a multi-page section on Cloud Security – proof positive that cloud services are now firmly on the business agenda.  While I understand the attraction of cloud in delivering quick, cost effective and scalable solutions to business problems, it strikes me that it also presents yet another opportunity for the business to cut IT (and particularly IT Security) out of the decision making process.

A few weeks back the BCS Information Systems Security Group held their AGM at IBM Bedfont and a number of IBMers including myself presented during the course of the day.  My topic was “Maintaining Security Governance in the Cloud”.

My central theme was that cloud computing offers the prospect of delivering IT capacity that dynamically flexes to meet changing business requirements.However, this flexibility and cost-effectiveness comes at a price.There is a substantial risk that sensitive information will leak out of the business, and the lack of transparency of the provider’s security processes make it essential that the business’s security governance processes are adapted to reflect these new risks.

Burton Group (recently acquired by Gartner, Inc.), Cloud Computing Security in the Enterprise, Dan Blum, July 15, 2009

So, faced with a new set of risks and preparing to trade control over IT systems (and their security) for the benefits of the SPI model of cloud services, never has it been so vital for the business to take good advice from  security Subject Matter Experts on the increased governance processes needed to protect the business data and (more importantly) its reputation.   Studies and surveys regularly report that 75% or more of businesses view security as the biggest single inhibitor to moving their IT operations into the Cloud.  This suggests that those businesses understand – at least intuitively – that traditional controls are built on physical access to the technology stack and that Cloud deployment models mean that control is passed to the Cloud Provider.  Nevertheless, a recent study conducted by Ponemon Institute for Symantec (“Flying Blind in the Cloud.  The State of Information Governance“) suggests that businesses are prepared to enter into contracts with Cloud Service Providers, without engaging their IT security team to advise them:

  • 65% select a CSP based on market reputation (word of mouth) while only 18% utilise their in-house security team to carry out an assessment
  • 80% admit that their in-house security team is rarely or never involved in the selection of s CSP
  • 49% are not confident that their organisation knows all the cloud services that are deployed.

In fact, businesses need to enlist the specialist knowledge of their security SMEs to help with the selection of a CSP and the negotiation of contracts.  The Cloud Security Alliance suggests in “Security Guidance for Critical Areas of Focus in  Cloud Computing V2.1” that,  together, they need to:

  • Review specific information security governance structure and processes, as well as specific security controls, as part of due diligence when selecting cloud service providers
  • Incorporate collaborative governance structures and processes between the business and the provider into service agreements
  • Engage their Security SMEs when discussing SLAs and contractual obligations, to ensure that security requirements are contractually enforceable.
  • Understand how current security metrics will change when moving to the cloud.
  • Include security metrics and standards (particularly legal and compliance requirements) in any Service Level Agreements and contracts.

Security SMEs will help to bring this about, when we can present a clear and unambiguous explanation to the business as to how the balance of risks and controls is altered in e Public Cloud and how this needs to translate to more sophisticated shared governance.  this in turns requires that we have a precise definition of what Cloud is and a robust baseline of cloud security knowledge.  The Cloud Security Alliance has introduced the Certificate of Cloud Security Knowledge (CCSK) to address this latter issue.  This certification is not designed to replace existing well-established schemes, such as CISSP, CISM and CISA, but rather  to demonstrate competence in the specific security challenges of Cloud deployments, by testing an understanding of two significant and authoritative documents:

The CCSK is strongly supported by a broad coalition of experts and organizations from around the world. The collaboration with ENISA means that the world’s two leading organizations for vendor neutral cloud security research are providing the foundation for the industry’s first cloud security certification. CSA’s breadth of industry participation and strategic alliances are being leveraged to communicate the need and value of this certification to employers within cloud providers, cloud consumers, consultants and variety of other stakeholders.  I’ll nail my colours to the mast here and commit to sitting the CCSK exam before the end of this year.  How about you?

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  1. […] Services:  I wrote in a previously post about the threats to security governance posed by cloud services.  In many organisations, business units are adopting cloud services without the advice and support […]


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